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Saturday, 24 December 2011

A Crashed UFO In Wales?

The following is taken from the chapter looking at crashed UFOs in Some Things Strange & Sinister (2009): 
 http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/some-things-strange-sinister/14958906?productTrackingContext=author_spotlight_338105_
 
Some Things Strange & Sinister

Probably the best account comes from Wales.The full details are given in the book along with photographs of Fragments "A" and "B".

    During the 1970s there were said to be three Crash-Retrievals from the Berwyn Mountains area.  In February, 1972, according to a man who claimed, in 1980, to have been part of an “Alien Craft Search-and-Retrieve” unit of the Special Air Service [SAS] Regiment, he and six other men “climbed Berwyn Mountain to see if there were any survivors from an ‘aircraft’ that had been intercepted and shot down by RAF interceptors.  ‘Mick’ was, apparently, unaware of the task of the unit he had joined –it was so secret its purpose was only explained to him after he returned to base.

 
‘Mick’ and his team reached wreckage at 00:30 hours and he was shocked to see “a damaged but perfect flying saucer just as described by George Adamski” (the Contactee).  A huge hole was in one side where the saucer had “been hit by two Sidewinder missiles that had forced the craft to crash”.  Next, several red canister grenades containing a “gas deadly to alien physiognomy[sic]” were thrown into the craft through the hole.  ‘Mick’ was very shocked when a “quite tall, long blond-haired man in grey-green jump suit” came coughing through the hole in the craft.  Captain ‘S’ stepped forward and shot the alien in the head.


    The men were told to “adopt standard procedure: anything alive- shoot”.  Three other aliens, all looking near identical, were found in the craft.  All were dead.  The men radioed their base, the men stood guard until a “massive helicopter” came in and carted off the craft.

    Also in 1980, another report cropped up that we had heard of before and felt it necessary to open a file on.

    On the 23rd January, 1974, there were explosions and strange lights seen over Llandrillo, Corwen, Llanderfel and several other locations.  National TV and Media reported on the event for a short while but quite soon the “facts” emerged.  People in the area thought that an aircraft had crashed on the Berwyn Mountains and anywhere between one to five witnesses rushed to the area where a “strange light display” was seen.  However, the witness(es) were stopped by police and very threatening men in civilian clothing and rudely told to leave the area “or face the consequences”.

    Then came the military jets, helicopters and ground vehicles.  Talking to Ufologist Margaret Fry, and in later correspondence, I pointed out that I did not believe there had been any crashed UFO.  I told her how, in 1982, someone who claimed to have been an RAF Flight Lieutenant had contacted Franklyn and myself and told us the following story:

          “On the 18th January,1974,I and a colleague were alerted by the
           CO [Commanding Officer] that we might be needed for an IO
           [In-Out] job.  I can name neither my Army Air Corps unit as you
           have requested or base as both are still operational.

          “We were armed and our job was confirmed on 19th January when
          we took an Army unit up past Birmingham and,on the 20th,we
          took said units to Llangollen/Llandrillo.  Here one of our units took
          a party of troopers to Porton Down and another followed later:we
          were told that if anyone tried to open one of the oblong boxes we were
          carrying back from Wales he was to be arrested or,if he resisted,shot.

          “A friend claims that he flew a Sikorsky that took some wreckage and
           a ‘gremlin’ to Porton Down.  He later suffered a nervous breakdown
           after seeing more of the ugly looking gremlins.”


    There are problems here as I explained to Margaret.  The Army Air Corps is not a part of the RAF.  Later, ’KM’ did identify his Commanding Officer and unit/base.  I was told that I would put his, Franklyn’s and my own lives at risk if I dug too deeply.  I was later sent “a piece of the alien craft” that had crashed in 1974.

    Another account, allegedly from a former SAS officer, backed up all of ‘KM’s account and I was very suspicious.  Margaret was quite excited and out of pure corteousy, I eventually relented and sent her small pieces of the material sent me.  I received a letter from Margaret in return stating that “…you will readily see that I must include your bit of information…in my account for Alien Encounters and International UFO Reporter…”  I telephoned Margaret and told her that everything ‘KM’ said I had proven to be a lie. I also pointed out that everything had been sent in complete confidentiality.

    This, I was told, was me being naive as that was part of the secret conspiracy plan: to ‘prove’ the account was fake to hide the truth.

    I had no idea how to politely tell Margaret what I thought of that theory when she dropped a bombshell: she had the fragments I sent her analyzed and they were made of “unknown metals”.  I pointed out that I believed (in fact, knew) the material was a mix of alloys but I was challenged to explain “why the elements are unknown on Earth”.

    In fact our test results were similar.


    Another “UFO fragment” from a 1979 ‘crash’ in the same area was actually granite with iron oxide traces on the surface.  Again, this was from an “ex-RAF” man with links to a Cheshire UFO group.

    In fact, both Margaret and Tony Dodd, a fellow Ufologist, suggested in articles that the military had advanced warning of an alien crash of two days.  This was just too much of a coincidence to have been information from anyone other than ‘KM’ himself.  

    In 1979 the true events of that night were explained to Franklyn and myself when we met a senior police officer, thanks to the Home Office, who in 1974 had been involved in the incident.  

    I imparted some but not all of this to Margaret Fry but it was dismissed (especially as some information was still regarded as confidential so I could not give names which, since Margaret did not seem to accept the confidential nature of previous correspondence was probably just as well).   

A copy of our report and conclusions on the incident was sent to both the Home Office and MoD.

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